Registered Vascular Specialist (RVS)

Requires: Passing the one-part Vascular Registry Examination

Who should apply: Professionals working in the area of Vascular Technology (Vascular Ultrasound)    

Specialty Examination Fee: $350

RVS Navigation

All applicants must meet the following criteria:

1. Have a high school diploma or general education diploma at the time of application.

2. Fulfill one (1) of the qualifications of the exam for which you are applying. See qualifications listed in the tables below.

3. Provide typed documentation to support the qualification under which you are applying. Required documentation for each qualification is listed below. CCI reserves the right to request additional information.

 

Criteria for NON-programmatically accredited programs in vascular ultrasound Criteria for Applications postmarked After July 1, 2013 Supporting Documentation
 

RVS1-2013
Two years of full-time or full-time equivalent work experience in vascular ultrasound. The applicant must have performed a minimum of 600** vascular ultrasound
studies at the time of application.

 

It is recommended, but not required, that the applicant have experience in the following areas:
• Carotid duplex ultrasound
• Transcranial Doppler
• Peripheral arterial physiologic
• Peripheral arterial duplex
• Venous duplex ultrasound
• Visceral vascular duplex ultrasound

In the verification letter the medical director(s) must confirm the number of studies performed during the applicant’s employment.

RVS1-2013
Employment Verification Letter
(must confirm the number of studies performed during the applicant’s
employment).

RVS5
A graduate of a NON-programmatically accredited program in vascular ultrasound which has a minimum of one year of specialty training and includes a minimum of 800 clinical hours in the specialty in which the examination is being requested.

Students enrolled in NON-programmatically accredited program in vascular ultrasound with a start date prior to September 1, 2013 will be eligible to apply for their specific registry examinations under this current qualification pathway after they graduate.

RVS235-2013
A graduate of a diploma, associate, or baccalaureate academic program in health science (including, but not limited to, cardiovascular technology, ultrasound, radiologic technology, respiratory therapy, or nursing)
AND
One year full-time work experience in vascular ultrasound
AND
Performance of a minimum of 600** vascular ultrasound studies in their career, which is defined as work experience and/or clinical experience gained during a formal educational program.

It is recommended, but not required, that the applicant have experience in the following areas:
• Carotid duplex ultrasound
• Transcranial Doppler
• Peripheral arterial physiologic
• Peripheral arterial duplex
• Venous duplex ultrasound
• Visceral vascular duplex ultrasound

In the verification letter(s) the medical director(s) and/or program director(s) must confirm the number of studies performed during the applicant’s employment and/or during the academic program.

RVS5
Completion certificate and/or educational transcript
AND

Student Verification Letter
AND

Clinical Experience Letter

RVS235-2013
Completion certificate and/or educational transcript
AND
Employment Verification Letter
AND
Clinical Experience Letter (only required for applicants submitting verification of the number of studies completed during a formal educational program)

  RVS4
Applicant must be a graduate of a programmatically accredited*** program in vascular ultrasound.

RVS4
Completion certificate and/or educational transcript
AND
Student Verification Letter

 

Students applying to take examination prior to graduation will be required to submit this documentation

 

IMPORTANT: If an individual’s studies were completed after graduation or if the hours are not a requirement for their educational program, then those hours WOULD NOT count toward the 800-hour minimum under qualification RVS5.
** If an individual’s clinical hours were obtained during a formal educational program, then those procedures completed WOULD count toward the minimum of 600 vascular ultrasound studies under qualification RVS235-2013.
*** An accredited program is accredited by an agency recognized by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA), United States Department of Education (USDOE), or Canadian Medical Association (CMA) that specifically conducts programmatic accreditation for cardiovascular technology, diagnostic cardiac sonography, or vascular technology.

 

Click here for sample Employment Verification Letter, Student Verification Letter and Clinical Verification Letter.

CCI requires the Employment Verification Letter contain the following:

1) Employer’s original, official letterhead or stationery.
2) Indicate the date the letter was signed by employer/supervisor.
3) Indicate the name of the applicant.
4) Indicate full- or part-time employment.
5) Indicate the time period of employment.
6) Indicate the primary duties of applicant, related to the field of cardiovascular technology.
7) Original signature of direct supervisor, who must be a MD or hold an active RCCS, RCES, RCIS, RCS, RDCS, RDMS, RPhS, RVS or RVT credential.

CCI requires the Student Verification Letter contain the following:

1) Educational program’s original, official letterhead or stationery.
2) Indicate the date the letter was signed by educational director.
3) Indicate the name of the applicant.
4) Indicate full- or part-time student.
5) Indicate the date or expected date of graduation.
6) Indicate the specialty of the educational program.
7) Original signature of the educational director.
8) For Non-programmatically accredited educational programs, indicate the program length, program specialty (Echo or Vascular or Invasive), the number and specialty of clinical hours accrued.

CCI requires the Clinical Verification Letter contain the following:

1) Clinical Site’s original, official letterhead or stationery.
2) Indicate the date the letter was signed by the clinical supervisor.
3) Indicate the name of the applicant.
4) Indicate the number of clinical hours.
5) Indicate the time period during which the clinical hours were performed.
6) Original signature of the clinical supervisor.
IMPORTANT: If an individual’s clinical hours were obtained after graduation from their educational program, then those hours WOULD NOT count toward the 800 hour minimum under qualification RVS5.

RVS Matrix & Content Outline Sunday, November 08th 2009 8:32 PM





This examination matrix is provided to illustrate the general distribution of questions and the relative weight or emphasis given to a skill or content area on the examination.
Content Category

Approximate Percentage of Examination
Prepare the ultrasound system/equipment for the examination 7%
Prepare the patient for examination 7%
Perform diagnostic examinations 18%
Perform Vascular Protocols (includes test indications, interpreting clinical and test results, and recognizing associated pathology and intervention findings) 51%
Manage data acquired during examinations & Create preliminary reports 9%
Professional Practices 8%

Total
100%




The list below describes general areas of knowledge that are needed in order to perform the tasks identified.  This knowledge will apply across multiple tasks.
Regulatory and Compliance Standards


Medical ethics


Medical terminology


General anatomy


Cardiovascular anatomy and physiology


Vascular hemodynamics


Disease process and progression


Basic math skills (formulas, exponents, decimals, scientific notation)


Basic statistics


Basic pharmacology


History & physical


   *Vascular signs and symptoms


   *Risk factors (family history, genetics)


Patient care and assessment


Basic Life Support (BLS)


Safety practices for patients and staff


Universal Precautions/infection control


Specific policies and procedures (e.g., department, hospital)


Ultrasound physics


    *Ultrasound instrumentation


   *Ultrasound modalities (e.g., Doppler, Color Doppler, B-mode, Contrast)


Vascular anomalies and normal variances


Vascular nonsurgical interventions (e.g., medications, risk factor modification)


Vascular surgical interventions (current and past)


Imaging modalities (e.g., CT, MR)


Exam correlation with other imaging modalities


 


The task list below describes the activities which an RVS is expected to perform on the job.  All examination questions are linked to these tasks.
A Prepare the ultrasound system/equipment for the examination
7%
  Set up equipment(turn on, select presets, enter patient data)

  Select transducers

  Disinfect equipment

  Position the equipment, adjust height of table/bed, chair

  Apply gel to transducer (understand reasons for, physics)

  Adjust preliminary
control settings


  Manage work flow

B Prepare the patient for examination
7%
  Greet patient and verify patient demographics & ID

  Educate patient/family about the procedure and determine needs

  Position the patient

  Adjust environment (lighting, temperature, mood)

  Inform patient about how to obtain results and direct them to next destination

  Remove and replace dressings, medical devices as appropriate

  Determine the clinical question

C Perform diagnostic examinations
18%
  Obtain patient height, weight, blood pressure

  Capture optimal images based on probe placement and instrumentation

  Select imaging planes and reposition patient as needed

  Define anatomy and hemodynamics

  Select imaging modality

  Interpret images and modify examination to answer the clinical question

  Measure and quantify findings (how to)

  Instruct patient to perform physiologic maneuvers

  Assess urgency of findings

D Perform Vascular Protocols (includes test indications, interpreting clinical and test results, and recognizing associated pathology and intervention findings) 51%
D.A Abdominal

  Perform renal duplex

  Perform mesenteric/splenic

  Perform abdominal aorta

  Perform hepatoportal duplex

D.B Cerebrovascular

  Perform carotid duplex

  Perform TCI duplex

  Perform transcranial doppler

D.C Peripheral Arterial

  Perform upper extremity arterial duplex

  Perform lower extremity arterial duplex

  Perform bypass graft surveillance

  Perform resting ABI

  Perform exercise ABI

  Perform upper & lower segmental pressures

  Perform PVR and Doppler waveforms

  Perform PPG - ARTERIAL

D.D Peripheral Venous

  Perform upper extremity venous duplex

  Perform lower extremity venous duplex

  Perform saphenous vein mapping

  Perform venous insufficiency testing

  Perform ultrasound guided RF/Laser ablation

  Perform PPG - VENOUS

D.E Special Procedures

  Perform dialysis access mapping

  Perform psuedoaneurysm intervention

  Perform penile pressures

  Perform reactive hyperemia

  Perform Laser Doppler

  Perform TCPO2

  Perform vascular imaging with contrast

  Perform intra-operative duplex

  Perform endovascular ultrasound

  Perform mammary artery mapping (IMA)

  Perform cold/heat challenge

  Perform thoracic outlet maneuvers

  Perform Allen's test

  Perform radial artery mapping

E Manage data acquired during examinations & Create preliminary reports
9%
  Review images and findings

  Analyze data (qualitative and quantitative) and interpret findings

  Input data into report and send for finalization

  Complete billing functions as appropriate

  Communicate with the health care team (results, patient needs, etc.)

  Notify medical staff of abnormal/critical results

  Maintain confidentiality

  Manage data flow and images

F Professional Practices
8%
  Maintain equipment and patient areas

  Ensure Standard/Universal Precautions/sterile techniques

  Respond to emergency situations

  Maintain competency and quality assurance

Totals  

  1. What mechanism is primarily responsible for returning blood to the heart while walking:
    1. Gravity
    2. Venous valves
       
    3. Skeletal muscle
       
    4. Arterial pressure
  2. A TIA of the left anterior hemisphere of the brain will MOST likely affect:
    1. Entire body
       
    2. Left side of the body
       
    3. Right side of the face
       
    4. Right side of the body
  3. Intracranial circulation is a:
    1. Low-flow, low resistance system
       
    2. Low-flow, high resistance system
       
    3. High-flow, low resistance system
       
    4. High-flow, high resistance system
  4. Failure to produce augmentation of a Doppler signal in the common femoral vein following thigh compression suggests obstruction of what vein?
     
    1. Popliteal
       
    2. External iliac
       
    3. Greater Saphenous
       
    4. Femoral  Answers
      1. c  2. d   3. c   4. d  

The textbooks listed below are intended as recommended resources when preparing for examination. You may have previous or later editions of these or other references available that also present acceptable coverage of the subject matter. Any general text in cardiovascular techniques and evaluation, and cardiac patient care and management may be used. It is not necessary to use all of the texts identified. They are provided as suggestions only. CCI does not endorse or recommend any third-party review course or material.

 

1. AbuRahma, Ali F., and John J. Bergan. Noninvasive vascular diagnosis a practical guide to therapy. 2nd ed. London: Springer, 2006.
2. Belanger, Ann. Vascular Anatomy and Physiology: An Introductory Text. 1st ed. Pasadena, CA: Davies Inc, 1990.
3. Daigle, Robert J.. Techniques in noninvasive vascular diagnosis: an encyclopedia of vascular testing. 3rd ed. Littleton, CO: Summer Pub., 2008.
4. Edelman, Sidney K.. Understanding ultrasound physics. 3rd ed. Woodlands, Tex.: ESP, 2005.
5. Foley, W. Dennis. Color doppler flow imaging. Boston: Andover Medical Publishers, 1991.
6. Gray, Henry, Susan Standring, Harold Ellis, and B. K. B. Berkovitz. Gray’s anatomy: the anatomical basis of clinical practice.. 40th ed. Edinburgh: Elsevier Churchill Livingstone, 2009.
7. Hennerici, M., and Doris Heusler. Vascular diagnosis with ultrasound: clinical reference with case studies. 2nd rev. ed. Stuttgart: Thieme, 2005.
8. Kremkau, Frederick W., and Flemming Forsberg. Sonography principles and instruments. 8th ed. St. Louis, Mo.: Elsevier/Saunders, 2011.
9. Miele, Frank R.. Ultrasound physics & instrumentation. 4th ed. Forney, TX: Miele Enterprises, 2006.
10. Netter, Frank H., and Carlos A. G. Machado. Netter’s atlas of the human body. Hauppauge, N.Y.: Barron’s, 2006.
11. Rumwell, Claudia, and Michalene McPharlin. Vascular technology: an illustrated review. 4th ed. Pasadena, Calif.: Davies Pub., 2009.
12. Thrush, Abigail, and Timothy Hartshorne. Vascular ultrasound: how, why, and when. 3rd ed. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone, 2010.
13. Zierler, R. Eugene. Standness’s duplex scanning in vascular disorders. 4th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2009.
14. Zwiebel, William J., and John S. Pellerito. Introduction to vascular ultrasonography. 5th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders, 2005.

 

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